Magazine – Home Railway Journal http://homerailwayjournal.com/ Thu, 26 May 2022 05:45:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://homerailwayjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon.png Magazine – Home Railway Journal http://homerailwayjournal.com/ 32 32 Where To Find Live Music In Central Oregon | TO GO! Magazine https://homerailwayjournal.com/where-to-find-live-music-in-central-oregon-to-go-magazine-2/ Tue, 24 May 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/where-to-find-live-music-in-central-oregon-to-go-magazine-2/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic ofBarbadosBelarusBelgium, […]]]>

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‘METROLOGY BREW’ Newsletter – May 9 – Metrology and Quality News https://homerailwayjournal.com/metrology-brew-newsletter-may-9-metrology-and-quality-news/ Mon, 16 May 2022 07:15:13 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/metrology-brew-newsletter-may-9-metrology-and-quality-news/ Read a brief summary of metrology and smart manufacturing news from the last 7 days. Dynamic 9D LADAR to revolutionize production measurements API has launched its DYNAMIC 9D LADAR (LAser Detection and Ranging) system, an innovative measurement solution that captures both dimensional and surface geometry data. The system incorporates revolutionary technology that is expected to […]]]>

Read a brief summary of metrology and smart manufacturing news from the last 7 days.

Dynamic 9D LADAR to revolutionize production measurements

API has launched its DYNAMIC 9D LADAR (LAser Detection and Ranging) system, an innovative measurement solution that captures both dimensional and surface geometry data. The system incorporates revolutionary technology that is expected to revolutionize automated production measurements … Read more

Launching a new approach to portable 3D measurement software

Have you always dreamed of having an efficient 3D metrology software that could allow you to calculate, in one click, all your 3D analysis needs? NextMeasure is available for all 3D scanners, measuring arms and laser trackers … Read more

SuPAR augmented reality interactive inspection

SuPAR Augmented Reality technology, developed by CDM Tech GmbH, enables users to perform faster and flawless quality inspection processes, providing rapid inspection of production parts. Augmented reality software for quality assurance provides real-time actual/target comparison … Read more

IBS Quality and Verisurf present a portable cobot inspection system

IBS Quality GmbH has launched its new PAM-System (Portable Automated Measurement System), a cobot-based portable 3D scanning and measurement solution. The launch is in collaboration with Verisurf Software and its integrated 3D measurement software for automated quality inspection, reporting, scanning and reversing … Read more

Smart Vision technology ensures the production line never stops

The assembly line at the ŠKODA plant in Mladá Boleslav is one of the Czech automaker’s busiest. The best-selling ŠKODA OCTAVIA is produced here, as is the ŠKODA ENYAQ iV electric SUV. Every minute of downtime on this line means losses in the form of unproduced cars. In addition to the quality … Read more

Master plan for the car production of the future

This is the blueprint for the automotive production of tomorrow: The BMW iFACTORY production strategy defines the future direction of the BMW Group’s factories and production technologies and addresses the challenges of the transformation towards e-mobility. “Automotive manufacturing of the future requires a new holistic way of thinking … Read more

AutoInspect takes the quality of industrial inspection processes to new levels

The quality of industrial production processes is ensured by a large number of individual sensor-based inspections generating large amounts of data. However, until now, information from individual sensors has generally only been examined in isolation. … Read more

VCxray launches an X-ray operating system for non-destructive testing

VCxray demonstrated a complete x-ray operating system named x.OS at the Control exhibition in Stuttgart, Germany. The origins of VisiConsult lie in the development of innovative software solutions for industrial X-ray inspection … Read more

WENZEL and VisiConsult announce cooperation in CT metrology

WENZEL Group and VisiConsult have signed a cooperation agreement for development and sales partnership. The cooperation agreement aims to jointly extend the successes achieved to date in the field of CT-based metrology solutions … Read more

Accurate and intuitive pitch gauge range provides a measured feel

Mahr introduced its new Digimar 817 CLT height measuring device offering touch control, ergonomic handling and a wide range of evaluation options: Available in three measuring ranges: 350mm, 600mm and 1000mm, the Digimar 817 CLT offers multiple data logging and transfer options … Read more

The sound scanner makes machine noise visible

Seven Bel’s patented innovation of a moving sensor Sound Scanners is capable of simulating up to 480 microphone positions over a circular area while using only five built-in microphones. Comparable acoustic cameras are normally equipped with around 100 microphones … Read more

Repair STL and scan data at the push of a button

4D_Additive’s new function called ‘Marching Cube’ repairs and simplifies 3D scan data and STL files in closed volumes, in the shortest possible time. The latest version of 4D_Additive has a revolutionary tool to simplify tessellated files and turn them into closed solids … Read more

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Sight Magazine – Guard “Heroes”, buyers among the victims of the shootings in Buffalo in the United States https://homerailwayjournal.com/sight-magazine-guard-heroes-buyers-among-the-victims-of-the-shootings-in-buffalo-in-the-united-states/ Mon, 16 May 2022 00:15:03 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/sight-magazine-guard-heroes-buyers-among-the-victims-of-the-shootings-in-buffalo-in-the-united-states/ May 16, 2022 CAROLYNE THOMPSON Buffalo, New YorkPA Aaron Salter was a beloved community member and security guard who knew Tops Friendly Market shoppers by name. When they were attacked by a man with a gun, he quickly sprang into action to protect his community. The retired Buffalo police officer shot the assailant multiple times, […]]]>

Buffalo, New York
PA

Aaron Salter was a beloved community member and security guard who knew Tops Friendly Market shoppers by name. When they were attacked by a man with a gun, he quickly sprang into action to protect his community.

The retired Buffalo police officer shot the assailant multiple times, hitting his armored vest at least once. The bullet did not penetrate and Salter was shot and killed.

“He’s a real hero,” Buffalo Police Commissioner Joseph Gramaglia said Sunday. “There could have been more victims without his actions.”

People gather outside the scene of a shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, on Sunday, May 15. PHOTO: AP Photo/Matt Rourke.

Salter was one of 10 killed in an attack whose victims represented a cross section of life in the predominantly black neighborhood of Buffalo, New York. They were shot by a white man who authorities say showed up at the store for the “express purpose” of killing black people. Three others were injured.

Salter, who was black, “cared about the community. He took care of the store,” said local resident Yvette Mack. She remembered him as someone who “let us know if we were right or wrong”.

Mack would go to the store to play lottery numbers and shop. She said she spoke to Salter shortly before the shooting.

“I was playing my numbers. He said ‘I see you playing your numbers!’ I laughed. And he also played his numbers. Can you imagine seeing someone, and you don’t know they’re not going home? ” she says.

The people Salter tried to protect include a man who was in town visiting relatives and picking up a surprise birthday cake for his grandson.

“He never went out with the cake,” Clarissa Alston-McCutcheon said of her cousin. She said that kind of surprise was typical for him. He was “just a loving, caring guy. He loved his family. He was always there for his family.”



Ruth Whitfield was the 86-year-old mother of retired Buffalo Fire Marshal Garnell Whitfield. She had just been visiting her husband at a nursing home, as she did every day, when she stopped in Tops to buy some groceries and was killed, her son told The Buffalo News.

Ruth Whitfield was “a mother to orphans” and “a blessing to all of us”, her son said. He attributed his strength and commitment to his family to his strong religious faith.

“She inspired me to be a man of God and to do whatever I do the best that I could. I couldn’t have done it without her,” Garnell Whitfield said.

Shooting at Buffalo in the United States2

A man reads scripture at the site of a memorial honoring victims of Saturday’s shooting, Sunday, May 15, in Buffalo, New York. PHOTO: AP Photo/Joshua Bessex.

Roberta Drury had recently returned home to live with her mother, Dezzelynn McDuffie, who said The Buffalo News that the 32-year-old had traveled to Tops to do his shopping on Saturday afternoon. Soon, McDuffie saw gruesome videos circulating on social media that appeared to show the shooter shooting his daughter just outside the store.

Customer Katherine Massey, whose sister, Barbara Massey, called her “a beautiful soul”, was also killed, and Haywood Patterson, who worked as a driver, taking people to and from Tops and helping them make the grocery store.

Patterson was loading an elderly woman’s groceries into his car when he was killed, friend Tony Sanders says The Buffalo News. Sanders said Patterson’s first name was Heyward, although a church bulletin listed him as Haywood. Sanders said Patterson was a deacon at his church and “my best friend.”

Zaire Goodman, 20, was among those injured, having been shot in the neck, Sen. Tim Kennedy said at a church service on Sunday. Goodman is the son of a Kennedy staffer.

“I’m devastated. I’m angry,” Kennedy said, adding that Goodman was recovering. “And I’m thinking of the families who won’t be welcoming a loved one tonight.”

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KERA set to take over city-owned WRR https://homerailwayjournal.com/kera-set-to-take-over-city-owned-wrr/ Fri, 13 May 2022 18:29:36 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/kera-set-to-take-over-city-owned-wrr/ Next month’s direction may change for WRR, the city-owned classical music station, but the station will retain its locally scheduled classical format. KERA and the City of Dallas Office of Arts and Culture are in the process of reaching a management agreement for the station, which is the first licensed broadcast station in Texas and, […]]]>

Next month’s direction may change for WRR, the city-owned classical music station, but the station will retain its locally scheduled classical format.

KERA and the City of Dallas Office of Arts and Culture are in the process of reaching a management agreement for the station, which is the first licensed broadcast station in Texas and, at 101 years old, one of the oldest. active radio stations in the country.

Until now, the station had to be autonomous, explained the Friends of the WRR on its website.

“WRR does not operate at the expense of taxpayers but as a ‘business’ of the City of Dallas, a self-governing government fund that sells advertising and sponsorships to generate revenue to cover its expenses,” the organization said. non-profit. “This model allowed the station to successfully broadcast classical music to anyone in Dallas who could receive the signal. Revenues exceeding expenses have always been invested in the station’s capital needs, and a small portion has been transferred over the years to the Arts and Culture Bureau’s Arts Endowment Fund to support small and medium-sized businesses. arts organizations.

Last year, Dallas officials decided to withdraw from radio station management and issued a request for proposals. KERA was ultimately selected as the preferred bidder, and the proposed contract will be submitted to city council next month for approval, the station said in a press release Friday.

The station will retain its current format (one of the conditions of the tender) and will be operated by KERA and owned by the city. It will also continue to operate from its Fair Park studios for the next seven years.

“KERA is honored to be considered to manage WRR and further its commitment to classical music,” said Nico Leone, President and CEO of KERA. “Together, we can help WRR grow and serve diverse audiences in Dallas and North Texas, ensuring WRR will continue for generations to come. And given our own commitment to arts and culture and our strong partnerships both locally and nationally, KERA is well positioned to build on the success WRR has achieved over its incredible 101-year history.

The public radio station says it is best suited to run the historic station because of its deep arts coverage and commitment to North Texas.

“We are a public broadcasting organization,” Leon said in KERA’s story about the contract. “We have been one for over 60 years. We operate an NPR station, a PBS station, a triple-A music station,” Leone said. “And the one format that we don’t have in our family that really thrives in public broadcasting is classical music.”

This is not the first time in 101 years that WRR has been faced with the fact that the city no longer wants to operate it.

The station, according to Friends of the WRR, got its start when Henry “Dad” Garrett installed a 50-watt radio transmitter at the Central Fire Station in 1920. Between transmitting fire and police reports, Garrett has played his collection of classic recordings on a phonograph which he hooked up to the transmitter. By 1921, the station was broadcasting police reports, baseball scores, weather forecasts, and classical music.

In 1925, the station’s operating expenses worried city officials, so they let the station’s license expire. Several city leaders raised funds to bring the station back, and within three months the station was back.

WRR moved from the fire station to the Adolphus Hotel, then to the Jefferson, then to the Hilton before settling permanently at the fairgrounds in the late 1930s. WRR added an FM station in 1948 and broadcast to both on AM and FM until the sale of its AM station in 1978.

Author

Bethany Erickson

See profile

Bethany Erickson is the Senior Digital Editor of Magazine D. She has written about real estate, education policy, the stock market, and crime throughout her career, and sometimes all at the same time. She hates lima beans and 5 a.m. and takes SAT practice tests for fun.

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Where To Find Live Music In Central Oregon | TO GO! Magazine https://homerailwayjournal.com/where-to-find-live-music-in-central-oregon-to-go-magazine/ Tue, 10 May 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/where-to-find-live-music-in-central-oregon-to-go-magazine/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic ofBarbadosBelarusBelgium, […]]]>

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Milestone in sturgeon science: 2,000th fish tagged https://homerailwayjournal.com/milestone-in-sturgeon-science-2000th-fish-tagged/ Tue, 10 May 2022 14:15:59 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/milestone-in-sturgeon-science-2000th-fish-tagged/ Dr. Matt Balazik, who researches Atlantic sturgeon at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Rice Rivers Center, caught, tagged and released his 2,000and sturgeon last week. This landmark fish, tagged near Westover Plantation a few miles downriver from the Rice Rivers Center, was a 24-inch juvenile that represents years of research. Genetic testing indicated he was born as […]]]>

Dr. Matt Balazik, who researches Atlantic sturgeon at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Rice Rivers Center, caught, tagged and released his 2,000and sturgeon last week. This landmark fish, tagged near Westover Plantation a few miles downriver from the Rice Rivers Center, was a 24-inch juvenile that represents years of research. Genetic testing indicated he was born as part of the 2018 James River fall sturgeon cohort. Each of these 2,000 fish carry a unique Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag that registers on a receiver if captured.

In addition to PIT beacons, 200 of the sturgeons also carry radio tracking beacons with unique frequencies. Thanks to the Atlantic Coastal Telemetry (ACT) network of receivers, Balazik knows at all times where most of these radiotagged sturgeons are and how far they have travelled.

Balazik recently looked at last year’s data to make a discovery that surprised even him. A sturgeon tagged in the 2021 spawning run traveled a breathtaking 525 miles.

“I knew they had traveled at least 100 kilometers to get to the spawning habitat, but I hadn’t realized how far some of them had traveled back and forth,” he said. declared. Of the 25 fish he checked, the average was 570 kilometers (354 miles).

The patterns were interesting. Some fall season male fish swam to their main spawning grounds early in the season between Osborne Landing and Curles Neck, mated with mature females, then moved downstream back to Burwell’s Bay, but smelled another mature female swimming upstream late in the season and followed her, doubling their travel distance. Radio beacons and the ACT network offer an extraordinary look into the lives of these mysterious ancient fish.

He has just finished tagging spring mature fish, as they will complete their activities around May 22. Balazik will work on his data and then over the summer will start looking for fish that are coming in for James’ biggest fall run, which will last from late August through early/mid-October. In the fall, lower seasonal rainfall means salt water reaches higher up the James than in the spring, so big fish have to swim further upstream to find the fresh water they need to spawn with. hit.

Balazik’s discovery of the 525-mile endurance athlete sturgeon inspired a fun fitness challenge for the Rice Rivers Center. When Balazik was biking along the Virginia Capital Trail near Jamestown in March, he had the idea of ​​trying to cycle the distances covered by sturgeons during their spawning grounds.

In addition to covering the distance himself, Balazik and the Rice Rivers Center challenge endurance athletes to bike, run, walk, swim, paddle or row these distances. The inaugural James River Spring Sturgeon Challenge encourages participants to set a goal similar to the voyages of the James River Sturgeon, with a May 22 race end date deadline. The minimum would be a day trip the shortest distance of a spring sturgeon. moved during the season: 212 kilometers (about 132 miles). The maximum corresponds to the longest, 841 kilometers.

“Let your imagination run wild,” Balazik said. “Feel free to run, walk or cycle anywhere in the world and share your goals and experiences.”

If you like the idea, but the May 22 deadline comes too early for planning, don’t be disappointed. “We’ll take on the challenge again in the fall,” Balazik said. “I already have the numbers and it’s going to be even further than the spring challenge.” Stay tuned bay bulletin for more information on Atlantic Sturgeon in the Chesapeake and the VCU Rice Rivers Center Fall James River Sturgeon Challenge.

-John Page Williams

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Rescue boat engine fire off the Rhode River https://homerailwayjournal.com/rescue-boat-engine-fire-off-the-rhode-river/ Sat, 07 May 2022 01:42:47 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/rescue-boat-engine-fire-off-the-rhode-river/ Two boaters are safe after their 37ft motorboat caught fire on the way to the dock on Friday morning, causing an explosion that could be heard for miles around. Maryland Natural Resources Police (NRP) said the pair were attempting to dock their boat Monterey at Holiday Hill Marina in Whitemarsh Creek, just off the Rhode […]]]>

Two boaters are safe after their 37ft motorboat caught fire on the way to the dock on Friday morning, causing an explosion that could be heard for miles around.

Maryland Natural Resources Police (NRP) said the pair were attempting to dock their boat Monterey at Holiday Hill Marina in Whitemarsh Creek, just off the Rhode River in Edgewater. One of the boat’s engines failed. When we tried to restart the engine, the boat caught fire. Luckily, the two were close enough to a nearby pier to jump off before the boat was completely engulfed.

Photo courtesy of Anne Arundel County Fire Department.

Anne Arundel County, Annapolis City and Woodland Beach Volunteer Fire Departments all responded with the NRP and assisted in putting out the blaze.

Both boaters were taken to a local trauma center for what the NRP calls “precautionary measures” and treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

NRP is investigating the incident and has not yet determined a cause.

The Woodland Beach Volunteer Fire Department reports that the explosion could be heard and felt throughout the Edgewater area.

Bay Bulletin will continue to follow this story and bring you updates.

-Meg Walburn Viviano

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The Roots of a Christian Magazine https://homerailwayjournal.com/the-roots-of-a-christian-magazine/ Thu, 05 May 2022 23:15:00 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/the-roots-of-a-christian-magazine/ If I’ve heard the question just once, I’ve probably heard it a hundred times: “What made you think of the WORLD in the first place?” It’s like people imagine a time and a place where God tapped me on the shoulder and said, “Joel, when I look at how news journalism is done today, both […]]]>

If I’ve heard the question just once, I’ve probably heard it a hundred times: “What made you think of the WORLD in the first place?”

It’s like people imagine a time and a place where God tapped me on the shoulder and said, “Joel, when I look at how news journalism is done today, both in America and around the world, I see a great void. This is how I want you to fill it.

Indeed, God could have done something like that. Such specificity would have been quite handy on the winding path of WORLD’s 36-year history. This would have helped us solve issues such as staff selection, publication frequency (see CEO Kevin Martin’s column in our May 7 issue), print quality, use of photography, determining the cost to the client, the role of the board of directors, the expansion into digital publishing, etc.

It’s quite difficult to be so totally involved in the technical side of things and not develop an interest in the ideas being expressed.

But he did not do it. God never handed me a business start-up plan or an instruction manual. No dazzling cloud formations or planes writing in the sky. Instead, God usually has less sensational tools to teach us.

I think God may have started planting the seed of a Christian news magazine long ago when my father sat me down – perhaps with my four brothers and three sisters – to introduce us to the wonders of a Kelsey 3×5 printing press and the peculiarities of the California working case. Somehow, things clicked. I’ve seen people pay attention to the printed page – and perhaps especially when they can witness the printing process of that page firsthand. The Kelsey 3×5 press quickly gave way to a 5×8 companion, which was replaced within a year by a Gordon 8×10.

The ink, you see, got into our blood. We didn’t want to go from tiny business cards to church bulletins and then from school newsletters to university yearbooks. Specifically, we never intended to be involved in creating and enhancing the editorial content of the dozens of prints we helped produce.

But it’s quite difficult, we discovered, to be so totally involved in the technical side of things and not develop an interest in the ideas being expressed. I still remember arguing with my dad about how unlikely a country printing company in Iowa would be trusted to handle some of the ideological tensions that arose from time to time between three of our biggest customers. At that time, we were doing major monthly mailings for Far Eastern Gospel Crusade, for the Tokyo Bible Center (with its somewhat feisty leader, Timothy Pietsch), and for the Christian Anti-Communism Crusade (with Australian physician and activist Dr. Fred Schwarz).

All were known as top organizations. Even so, we managed to operate close and do our job.

In all the turmoil of such a culture, I still remember a walk-in visit from a homeless guy who wanted us to print him some letterhead. From the beginning, Dad had established a ground rule intended to prevent us from competing with other local printers. The rule was simple: everything we printed had to include a brief portion of Scripture. But when we talked to this man about politics, he was perplexed.

“I don’t know any Bible verses,” he said. So we handed him a Bible, and he sat there for almost an hour, flipping through its pages. Finally, he scribbled a note and handed it to me. I have never forgotten his choice: “And the Lord blessed the last days of Job more than his beginning” (Job 42:12).

I still find reason to believe that this was not altogether bad preparation for launching a Christian news magazine.

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Home Office Problems – New Jersey Business Magazine https://homerailwayjournal.com/home-office-problems-new-jersey-business-magazine/ Thu, 05 May 2022 05:05:28 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/home-office-problems-new-jersey-business-magazine/ General Business A spotlight on the legal, cybersecurity, tax and insurance issues that employers and employees face and must overcome in the work-from-home environment. By Lisa Goulian Twiste, Contributing Editor May 5, 2022 Remote work, already more common in recent years, has become the norm in 2020 as part of the COVID-19 public health response. […]]]>

General Business

A spotlight on the legal, cybersecurity, tax and insurance issues that employers and employees face and must overcome in the work-from-home environment.

Remote work, already more common in recent years, has become the norm in 2020 as part of the COVID-19 public health response. Even with government mandates lifted and the pandemic appearing to be on the wane, many New Jerseyans continue to work from a home office — at least some of the time — making it increasingly important for businesses to rethink their corporate structures and to flesh out its “work from home” policies.

A 2020 survey by The Conference Board, an independent association of business and research members, found that 83% of companies expect full-time employees to continue working from home for at least three days a week. week after the pandemic. According to a February 2022 study from the Pew Research Center, 59% of Americans with jobs that can be done remotely work primarily from home, up from 71% at the height of COVID-19, but up significantly from 23% before. 2020. .

“If we are to look for a silver lining in the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s that we can work effectively from home and be productive,” says Eileen Oakes Muskett, partner at Fox Rothschild Attorneys at Law in Atlantic City. “However, as there is no longer a legal obligation to allow employees to work from home, employers must analyze each individual situation to determine whether working from home is the best alternative for both employer and employee. .”

Above all, Muskett urges customers with work-from-home employees to establish a remote work policy with guidelines for the workspace (including the type of equipment to be used); protect confidential information (including employees who bring sensitive documents back to the office on “shredding days”); and make time for regular breaks and exercise. “You want to give employees a safety checklist and virtual training on how to set up a workstation that includes a chair at the correct height,” she says. “If employees are working at a dining room table, you may see an increase in neck injuries.”

Muskett also suggests creating a virtual bulletin board where the employer posts notices that would typically be hung in a lunchroom, as well as setting up a time-tracking system for non-exempt employees, because working time unplanned and unpaid can cause problems down the road. – in particular in the event of dismissal of an employee.

“There are so many great programs out there for tracking work,” she says, referring to employee monitoring software like Time Doctor, Toggl, RescueTime, Hours and others. “What I’ve recommended to clients is that their employees review and certify their timesheets weekly. This way you have an affirmative statement from the employee that there has been no other working time that is not counted in their recorded time.

Additionally, Muskett says it’s important to keep company culture alive, which can include “team days” in the office. “Employers need to find a way to be flexible while still getting that collaborative, interactive work experience that most of us need to be efficient and produce the most optimal work product,” she adds.

DATA CONFIDENTIALITY

In 2021, a Help Net Security survey of 1,000 small and medium business owners found that 77% believe remote work poses a substantial cybersecurity risk to their business, while 66% find it is much more difficult to monitor their online infrastructure with so many employees. work from home. Cybersecurity being paramount, remote workers can take several steps to protect sensitive data from online predators, such as having separate computers for personal and professional use, choosing a strong password, learning to detect and avoid scams by phishing, install regular software. and antivirus updates, and always keeping the VPN enabled. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

According to Nicholas McCourt, cybersecurity engineer at East Windsor-based Integris, changing the way homeworkers think about cybersecurity is important. Many rely on their firewalls which, while offering some protection, are not “smart” like the latest software designed to monitor the network and look for suspicious activity.

“Companies have employees all over the world, so when the pandemic hit, (these programs) had to operate 24/7,” he says. “It’s a managed response, ensuring security is software-based rather than hardware-based, and vulnerability management, which has become more important than installing an appliance on a network and ‘running a scan once a year to tick a box.’

ASSURANCE

When it comes to insurance for remote workers, the costs are typically split between the company and the employee, says Matt Peroni, personal insurance underwriting supervisor for NJM Insurance Group in West Trenton. Employers typically maintain coverage for company-owned computers and equipment, while the employee’s home insurance policy must cover personal property, including furniture, purchased for household use.

Peroni goes on to point out that a home insurance policy is generally not designed to cover home-based businesses; in fact, many policies contain exclusions for incidents that occur on an employee’s property in connection with business-related activities. “Fortunately, an employer’s professional liability insurance policy often provides coverage to employees for injuries that occur while working from home,” he says. “At the same time, a remote employee who is injured at home and files a claim must prove that the incident occurred within the scope and scope of their employment.”

For an entrepreneur building a home-based business, a personal home insurance policy may provide limited coverage for certain

business-related risks, but generally won’t cover business-related liability or protect business data, Peroni says. He recommends reviewing your personal insurance policies to confirm coverages and exclusions and identify gaps. “Entrepreneurs, including sole proprietors, should consider several different types of coverage, including commercial liability, business owner, commercial auto, workers’ compensation, and professional liability policies” , he adds. “The coverage needed will vary depending on the nature and structure of the business.”

TAX MATTERS

And while remote employees may think they’re not responsible for paying taxes in the state where their physical office is located, that’s not necessarily the case, says Robert Carpenter, CPA, partner at Grassi Advisors & Accountants at Park Ridge. It’s also important to note that even if they work from home some or all of the time, employees who receive a W-2 from an employer are generally not eligible for a home office deduction – a reserved benefit. to the self-employed. whose home office is “for exclusive and regular business use, is the principal (or sole) office of their business and is used solely for business purposes”.

Working from home undoubtedly has many advantages, both for the employee who saves time and travel costs, and for the employer who can potentially reduce the size of office space and overhead. . “Now that traditionally non-remote employees have had a taste of working from home, there is a lot of value in the form of employee retention and satisfaction to allow them to continue in remote or hybrid roles,” adds Carpenter. “Employees who have proven they can work effectively in a remote environment have earned that confidence, and it goes a long way in helping them achieve the work-life balance they crave.”

For more business news, visit NYC News Now.

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‘METROLOGY BREW’ Newsletter – May 2 – Metrology and Quality News https://homerailwayjournal.com/metrology-brew-newsletter-may-2-metrology-and-quality-news/ Sun, 01 May 2022 06:40:26 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/metrology-brew-newsletter-may-2-metrology-and-quality-news/ Read a brief summary of metrology and smart manufacturing news from the last 7 days. SMART 3D scanning with LIDAR and structured light scanners Measurement service provider a3Ds from Germany specializes in optical measurements. Components of different sizes are measured automatically and without contact. a3Ds works with state-of-the-art equipment found in many production lines … […]]]>

Read a brief summary of metrology and smart manufacturing news from the last 7 days.

SMART 3D scanning with LIDAR and structured light scanners

Measurement service provider a3Ds from Germany specializes in optical measurements. Components of different sizes are measured automatically and without contact. a3Ds works with state-of-the-art equipment found in many production lines … Read more

Tolerance simulation software includes the effects of thermal expansion

Mechanical variation management experts Sigmetrix have announced their latest version of CETOL 6σ tolerance analysis software. CETOL 6σ is a powerful tolerance analysis software and has been specially developed to promote manufacturing efficiency … Read more

8tree expands use of dentCHECK for aircraft damage mapping

Horizon Air, a regional airline in the western United States, began using dentCHECK to improve the efficiency and quality of its aircraft damage reporting and mapping activities. “With dentCHECK, Horizon is able to quickly and accurately map dents … Read more

Laser optics are key to recent sustainable energy breakthrough

ZYGO Corporation is at the forefront of recent success in laser fusion, which opens up the possibility of a virtually unlimited supply of low-carbon, low-radiation energy. Today’s reliance on fossil fuels has obvious implications for ecosystems … Read more

AI-powered optimization software automates and digitizes to deliver digital thread

Middle River Aerostructure Systems (MRAS), a leading aerospace manufacturer of engine nacelles and aerostructures acquired by ST Engineering, has deployed Plataine’s AI-based optimization solution to automate and streamline … Read more

A researcher in optical sciences proposes a new method for measuring radio antennas

Joel Berkson, a third-year doctoral student at the University of Arizona James C. Wyant College of Optical Sciences and Steward Observatory, has developed a new way to accurately measure radio antenna surfaces, which are used to collect and focus radio waves … Read more

Augmented Reality System Simplifies Microscope-Based Manufacturing

The SZX-AR1 augmented reality system easily adapts to existing Olympus SZX series stereo microscopes to simplify complex microscope-based manufacturing tasks and simplify assembler training. Manuals, assembly instructions, images and instructional videos can be projected into the field of view of the microscope … Read more

Agile Robots receives $30 million in funding from Foxconn Industrial Internet

Agile Robots has announced that it has raised 30 million dollars (about 27.94 million euros) from Foxconn Industrial Internet (FII) in China. This is FII’s second strategic investment in Agile Robots. Previously, the company raised $220 million in its Series C funding round … Read more

Faro Technologies Announces First Quarter Financial Results

Faro Technologies released its first quarter 2022 financial result. Total sales were $76.7 million, in line with the prior year period; software sales, $10.3 million or 13% of revenue, remained in line with the prior year period. Operating expenses for the period were reported at $48.2 million, compared to … Read more

CyberOptics Announces First Quarter Financial Results

CyberOptics Corporation reported sales of $24.2 million for the first quarter 2022 ended March 31, an increase of 37% from $17.7 million in the first quarter 2021. Net income for the first quarter 2022 was $3.6 million, an increase of 149%. … Read more

BMW Group acquires stake in Process Automation & Digital Twin Enabler

The BMW group has taken a stake in its partner Kinexon. The two companies have been working together for several years to advance the full digitalization of the BMW Group production network … Read more

The iScan3D metrology-grade handheld 3D scanner offers the freedom to measure

API is showcasing its next generation iScan3D laser scanner at the CONTROL expo with improved optics and blue cross laser lines for fast and accurate generation of metrology-grade point clouds. iScan3D is the 3rd version of API’s metrology grade scanner … Read more

Verisurf software launches a new version 2023

Verisurf will demonstrate Verisurf 2023 at Control. Verisurf 2023 continues to refine metrology workflows with additional features designed to reduce time and improve efficiency for automated quality inspection and reporting, scanning, reverse engineering and authoring tools … Read more

Ideal platform for area measurement applications

The production of optical components in laser material processing, biotechnology, medical technology as well as semiconductor technology requires very precise surface measurements including non-destructive quality assurance. According to manufacturer Aerotech, the SMP is the optimal multi-axis motion system for such applications… Read more

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