high school – Home Railway Journal http://homerailwayjournal.com/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 20:05:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://homerailwayjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon.png high school – Home Railway Journal http://homerailwayjournal.com/ 32 32 25 years at the newspaper, and still living the dream – Daily Bulletin https://homerailwayjournal.com/25-years-at-the-newspaper-and-still-living-the-dream-daily-bulletin/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 00:26:11 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/25-years-at-the-newspaper-and-still-living-the-dream-daily-bulletin/ Thursday marked 25 years for me in this press group. What do they bring you after 25 years in the same profession? It should be something silver: a pocket watch, a lapel pin, a flask. But I’m not demanding on the color or the gift. As long as it’s not pink panties! Twenty-five years was […]]]>

Thursday marked 25 years for me in this press group. What do they bring you after 25 years in the same profession? It should be something silver: a pocket watch, a lapel pin, a flask.

But I’m not demanding on the color or the gift. As long as it’s not pink panties!

Twenty-five years was not a goal, and – a pause for me to knock on wood – is not an end point either. I’m not sure what to say about 25 years, other than that I think I’m going to like it here.

Time has not flown, of course. This would require a level of forgetting incompatible with 365 days of delays per year, multiplied by 25. Yet the years pile up one after the other. Ten years seemed like a milestone, then 15. The 20th kind of slipped past.

For my 25th birthday, I invited the boss lunch, on him. To his credit, he graciously accepted.

2022 is actually 35 years of journalism for me. I had 10 years combined at four previous newspapers in Sonoma County and Victorville before reporting for work in Ontario on March 10, 1997 at the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin.

My first beat was Fontana City Hall. All these years later, I still sometimes write about the town hall of Fontana. In fact, the March 22 board meeting is on my calendar. So I haven’t made much progress.

Notebook on knee, David Allen interviews painter Robert Lyn Nelson March 11 at the Chaffey Community Museum of Art in Ontario. (Courtesy of Lena Castles)

But in many other ways, the paper, the industry, and my work have changed enormously.

We were still largely a printing company 25 years ago, a company that only reluctantly had a website because our publisher thought giving away our content for free was crazy. Turns out he had good instincts.

We also had a newsroom full of people – almost as many people as Twitter – to publish a full-service newspaper in-house. Ah, those were the good old days. None of us knew how badly we had it, including you readers.

It went downhill from there, for all the reasons you’ve heard: tech giants stealing our content and advertising, various missteps by our industry, remote ownership, adults deciding that they shouldn’t have to pay for the information.

For a few years, unsuspecting readers who remembered me would ask me with irritating regularity, “Do you still write for the newspaper?” There was, briefly, a rumor that I had retired, also among stale readers. As I was still in the paper three times a week as always, I began to wonder if anyone was still reading.

But you read, and thank you for that.

The shrinking of our industry is one of the reasons I am in your newspaper if your newspaper is not the Daily Bulletin. Eleven entities belong to our Southern California Press Group, and I’m at three of them regularly — Press-Enterprise, Sun, and Bulletin — with semi-regular appearances at a few others.

I never would have seen this coming 25 years ago. We were all competitors. As a journalist friend told me last year, “You may be the only person to benefit from newspaper consolidation.”

It’s certainly a challenge trying to lead columns all over the Inland Empire (wherever it is), but challenges make life interesting, don’t they?

Staying in one place has its advantages. I got to know the people and places in my area quite well. There are stories I can tell that no one else could tell, just by dint of history and connections. Defending IE against outsider beards is a role I’m happy to take on – while of course reserving the right to aim for beards myself as an insider.

Admittedly, it’s not easy to write for a newspaper in 2022. It’s becoming an obscure profession, a niche product. “I don’t know when the last time I saw someone reading a newspaper,” a friendly stranger in his thirties told me in a cafe the other morning as I did just that. “I talk to my daughter about newspapers and she’s like, ‘What is that?'”

But my colleagues and I continue to manage for print and online. We are much fewer in number, but we are all committed to our mission.

Over the years I have worked with so many talented journalists, waves of them. At this stage, I know many more former journalists than working journalists because many have left the field, voluntarily or not.

There were times when I was afraid of being left behind, as if I had refused to take off the last plane from Kabul before the fall.

From their lips to his ears, former Mayor Ron Loveridge and current Mayor Patricia Lock Dawson talk about the Riverside Civil Rights March as David Allen takes notes in November 2021. (File photo by Terry Pierson, Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

A small shift in how I view myself happened about a decade ago. It was during a lunch in Pasadena with four former editorial colleagues, all women. All of them had long since moved on and all were doing better than me.

The three in PR said they miss journalism, though they didn’t seem too broken about it. Only the high school teacher was honest or self-aware enough to say she didn’t miss it at all.

Meanwhile, I was still at the Daily Bulletin after what was then about 15 years.

“I think it’s so great that you’re still here,” one said. Was she condescending or was it me feeling defensive?

I said dryly, “I’m still living the dream.”

I worried a bit about being in stasis, like the college grad who hangs on and becomes a city dweller. But over time, I leaned into this half-joking, half-provocative response from me. It reminds me why I got into this business.

It was for freedom, pleasure, public service. Journalism was an idealistic dream out of college, and I wasn’t ready to give it up.

And I still am not. Recently, I ran into a former colleague who now has a less stressful and better paying job. She mentioned that there was an opening. I raised my palm and said, “Before you ask, I’m not interested.” She smiled and said, “I know you’re not.”

Obviously, I’m a lifer, always happy to share stories, inform and entertain you, ready to hold on as long as they let me.

]]>
Tool Check: Aircraft Maintenance Ground School https://homerailwayjournal.com/tool-check-aircraft-maintenance-ground-school/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 14:32:29 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/tool-check-aircraft-maintenance-ground-school/ The trick was to balance on the front wheel, in just the right position, to gain access to the rear of the bulkhead that held the canopy selector valve. This task was accomplished in the cold rain, with MIL-H-5606 dripping down your face, while your buddies kicked your leg, yelling, “Hurry up, we eat in […]]]>

The trick was to balance on the front wheel, in just the right position, to gain access to the rear of the bulkhead that held the canopy selector valve. This task was accomplished in the cold rain, with MIL-H-5606 dripping down your face, while your buddies kicked your leg, yelling, “Hurry up, we eat in 15 minutes.

There’s a reason line maintenance is a younger game. I was in my early twenties, a little lithe, a little thinner, and just cocky enough to think I could get the faulty valve out before the car left for lunch.

Yes indeed.

The trick to working blind is to go ahead and close your eyes. They can’t help you, and some say that eliminating one sense strengthens the others. I had to rely solely on touch. The valve is behind a bulkhead, angled inboard and out of reach when standing flat on deck. Perched precariously on the front wheel, reaching behind me, working my hand up the hydraulic line, I miraculously reached the B-Nut. Congratulations, now how the hell do I get the thing off? I can barely reach it, let alone loosen it. How can I delete it? This mission looks like a job for a Crowfoot.

What is a crowbar? For those eagerly heading straight to Google, click on the tool link. Not the Siksika Native American chief of the same name. A crowbar looks like someone cut the end of a combination wrench with a hole to accept a ratchet drive. Well, kinda like that. It is an open-end wrench, which incorporates a means of attaching an extension. Perfect for hard-to-reach areas with minimal moving space, like the front wheel well of an A-6E Intruder.

A crowbar is a specialized tool designed, designed and produced for a specific purpose to reach where a wrench cannot.

Some people get by with a basic kit, while others go higher end. [Shark-Co]

Toolkits are personal

Some mechanics make do with a basic tool kit, adapting their style and improving their skills to get by. Others are heading in the opposite direction and outfitting their arsenal with every whiz-bang tool known to mankind. These people must have a very different tool budget than mine. Some toolboxes are huge and incorporate speakers, lights and independent suspension with anti-lock brakes. While they pack an impressive array of tools, is it worth buying and maintaining something you’ll only use once every five years?

You don’t have to go broke to equip your collection of shed tools. Start with the basics and expand as needed.

My tool collection started in high school when my brother and I received tool sets for Christmas one year. The black toolbox had a lid that lifted and three drawers that extended from the front. For a teenager, it was as close to a rite of passage as I was going to get. I still have a lot of tools today.

A necessary first lesson

Recently, we discussed the importance of procuring, receiving and installing approved aircraft parts. The next step in our pursuit of aircraft maintenance sustainability is tooling. Airplane maintenance goes far beyond fuel and takeoff. Remember those early days of ground school? The introduction to terms such as pitch, roll and yaw was forced on you before you set foot on the ramp. Paperwork, parts and tools are the basic school of aircraft maintenance. If you get a logbook entry wrong, it could cost you dearly.

The tools work like everything needed in everyday life. There are entry-level beginner sets, mid-level professional options, and complete custom sets with Bombardier-style financing required. If you have to ask how much, you can’t afford it. Mechanics are hyper protective of their tools because they make their living from them. My rig has had its ups and downs, and after 10 years at the mercy of my techs in the engine shop, let’s just say I have a few gaps in my offering.

So, ultimately, what should you do when equipping your inventory with aircraft-grade tools? I’m glad you asked this question. Just like a preflight, we have a checklist. My alma mater, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, publishes an excellent list of tools required for future airframe and powertrain (A&P) students. This resource is a great starting point, and not everything has to be obtained at once.

As profit sharing season approaches, why not live a little and go for a full subset? Kits are a great way to build tools, and it’s cheaper than buying one tool at a time. Look for seasonal offers and monthly promotions. Another great place to collect tools is to work with a local tool truck. Many of them are locally owned and operated; they have license agreement with MAC Tools, Snap-On, Cornwell or many other manufacturers.

As profit sharing season approaches, why not live a little and go for a full subset?

Some carriers will open a line of credit and schedule payments. They are informative and the good ones are always ready to offer advice. Plus, tool trucks are cool.

Gathering the proper tooling is just the start of a successful aircraft maintenance program. A tool control program is essential to ensure long-term success. Tool control is the management, organization and accountability of tools. It doesn’t matter if you’re using a Van’s RV-7 you built in your garage or managing multiple Beechcraft King Airs in a corporate flight department; tool control is at the heart of any maintenance plan.

The FAA has an advisory circular that deals with tool control. AC no. 150/5380-5B Risks linked to debris in civil airports deals several times with the control of tools. Yes, sure, you knew the FAA would have an AC on this. As we go along, it will be useful to note that the FAA will most likely have a technical bulletin on just about everything we discuss. Such is life in a regulated industry.

So far we have talked about hand tools. In subsequent articles in this series, we’ll explore the world of test equipment, flow benches, non-destructive testing (NDT), torque wrenches, and more. Each of the above items will require an additional layer of monitoring and calibration.

As with everything in aerospace, tooling must have documented controls to ensure proper operation. I recently spent time with Jon Byrd, Executive Director of Aviation and TCSG State Aviation Program Advisor for Georgia Northwestern Technical College (GNTC) in Rome, Georgia. We’ve covered several key issues facing aircraft maintenance, including tool control.

FLYING: How necessary is tool control for the aerospace industry?

Byrd: Tool control is essential for any aviation organization. There is no margin for error when maintaining aircraft. Tool control and loss prevention are part of the mindset, the culture of aviation. Something as simple as a casing left in a turbine engine nacelle would be devastating.

FLYING: What solutions has Georgia Northwestern Technical College implemented regarding tool control?

Byrd: GNTC operates out of the Russell Regional Airport/JH Towers Field (KRMG) Aviation Training Center in Rome, Georgia, and recently launched the Aviation 7S program, a modified version of the 5S organization method, adding the safety and security to better align with the industry. The 7S method focuses on shadowboxing toolkits. Benjamin Franklin once said a place for everything, everything in its place. Shark-Co Manufacturing builds custom foam molds that incorporate our minimum tool list and shape to fit the student’s toolbox.

FLYING: What is the first step in a tool inspection program?

Byrd: Evaluate your current program. Be honest with yourself and do a needs assessment. Can you detect in seconds if a tool is out of place? Once you have determined what is needed, create a plan, reevaluate it, and implement it.

Jon also offers this sound advice. Never allow yourself to feel comfortable in this industry. Complacency can be deadly in aviation. Continuous improvement should be your mindset, and an effective tool control program is the first step.

]]>
Montana teenager launches online newspaper in Spanish https://homerailwayjournal.com/montana-teenager-launches-online-newspaper-in-spanish/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/montana-teenager-launches-online-newspaper-in-spanish/ It’s not often that a teenager decides to start a journal. But after eight weeks of chronicling the life of Latinos in Big Sky as an intern student at a local newspaper, Samantha Suazo was hooked. “I’ve written about the fears, needs and everyday life of the Latino community,” Suazo told the Bozeman Daily Chronicle. […]]]>


It’s not often that a teenager decides to start a journal.

But after eight weeks of chronicling the life of Latinos in Big Sky as an intern student at a local newspaper, Samantha Suazo was hooked.

“I’ve written about the fears, needs and everyday life of the Latino community,” Suazo told the Bozeman Daily Chronicle. “And after I finished that, I realized that I couldn’t stop there.”

She dug up stories about Latinos for the Lone Peak Lookout that hadn’t been reported – a common challenge she found was the lack of reliable information for Spanish speakers. Bilingual herself, Suazo wanted that to change.

“My Latino community feels we weren’t part of the wider community due to lack of information,” she said. “I saw the problem.”

Suazo, 19, founded Noticias Montaña, or Mountain News, in 2020. It is Montana’s only Spanish-language publication and the online publication covers local and regional news from Gallatin County.

She writes general news, local affairs and features. She profiles successful members of the Latino community and posts news about events around Big Sky.

It always aims to publish reliable, useful and timely information for Spanish speakers, who otherwise do not always have access to local news.

“I knew Montana was actually one of the only states that didn’t have Spanish media in the country. Which shocked me,” Suazo said. “A lot of people come here to settle and we have to do something about that.”

While Gallatin County has a predominantly white population, the Latino and Hispanic population has grown steadily. According to the 2020 U.S. Census, the county’s Latino population grew 138% from 2010 to 2020 and now represents approximately 5% of the county’s population.

Gallatin County has the fastest growing Hispanic and Latino population in Montana, with Missoula County coming second.

Yet resources are still scarce for Spanish speakers, Suazo said. Often, she sees Latinos getting local information on social media and Facebook, and worries that it’s not always factual or reliable.

The language barrier makes the simple things more difficult and can prevent people from feeling well-informed, connected and valued.

Suazo knows firsthand how difficult it is to be the only one in the room who doesn’t speak the language.

When Suazo first arrived at Big Sky, she was the only Spanish speaker in her class.

Originally from Honduras, Suazo immigrated to the United States with his mother when he was 12 years old. A few months after arriving in the United States, Suazo and her parents moved to Big Sky.

There was a language barrier, culture shock and cold weather – all things that required Suazo to adapt.

“I learned to love it, I learned to settle down and build a life from scratch and create an environment that I will thrive in,” she said.

She wants to make the transition to Montana easier for other Latinos. She also happens to love what she does.

“It’s so much fun to go out into the world and listen to people and empathize with them,” she said. “Listening to their perspective and testimony, and then telling their story, giving them a voice and illuminating who they are is something I appreciate.”

As a founder, Suazo has had her share of signings – posting stories as often as she can.

But other teens and young adults also contributed last summer – through a paid internship funded by local nonprofit Women In Action.

Suazo doesn’t do it alone. In addition to having other interns and contributors, it has an editor, Barbara Rowley.

Rowley and Suazo met about two years ago, connected by a counselor from Suazo’s school who knew Rowley might be able to support Suazo.

Rowley, a Big Sky resident with a background in journalism, first edits Suazo’s stories in English. Then Suazo translates them into Spanish and publishes them.

Suazo and Rowley met about two years ago and clicked on their shared interest in journalism.

Rowley enjoys working with Suazo and sees a bright future for her, whatever career path she has chosen.

“I can say with everything, she can go places,” Rowley said. “She has this spark of intelligence and drive.”

Along with finishing her senior year in high school, she also started a Latino student association at her school.

“Samantha always says yes,” Rowley said. “Every time I bring something to her attention, every time someone asks her for help, it extends to people in her community who need help. Samantha always says yes and always finds the time .”

Suazo is a senior at Lone Peak High School and isn’t entirely sure what her future holds.

The future of Noticias Montaña is also uncertain. If Suazo leaves the state for college, she’ll have to find someone to take over publishing. She is looking for more contributing writers and potentially a successor.

She wants to go to college—she didn’t choose a college—and plans to become a lawyer.

“I want to make an impact in the world and go back to Honduras and help people there,” Suazo said.

But journalism, she says, will always be a part of her.

“It’s definitely something I will keep close to me for years to come,” she said. “No matter what I do, I will bond with him, because honestly, it changed my life. It shaped me and made me mature even more.”

]]>
Murder at Rochester’s State Hospital for the Insane – Post Bulletin https://homerailwayjournal.com/murder-at-rochesters-state-hospital-for-the-insane-post-bulletin/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 18:37:22 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/murder-at-rochesters-state-hospital-for-the-insane-post-bulletin/ Hospitals of all kinds are meant to be places of comfort and healing. In 1889, however, a patient at Rochester State Hospital for the Insane was killed in a case involving patient negligence and substandard staff. It cost the life of a man, caused the resignation of the superintendent of the hospital and damaged the […]]]>

Hospitals of all kinds are meant to be places of comfort and healing.

In 1889, however, a patient at Rochester State Hospital for the Insane was killed in a case involving patient negligence and substandard staff. It cost the life of a man, caused the resignation of the superintendent of the hospital and damaged the reputation of the establishment.

And the crime only came to light because a witness overcame his fear and finally told authorities what he had seen.

Rochester State Hospital was originally established by the state legislature in 1876 as an institution for drunks. It was to be funded by an annual tax of $10 on all establishments that sold liquor. The tax was challenged in the state Supreme Court, where it was ruled constitutional. But given the unpopularity of the tax, the whole idea was scrapped by the state and the mission of the new hospital was changed to the treatment of mental illnesses.

With the $36,000 in liquor tax that had already been collected, the state purchased a 160-acre farm from Jacob Rickert east of town – the current location of the Federal Medical Center in Rochester – and began construction of the main hospital building. Dr. Jacob Eaton Bowers, assistant superintendent at St. Peter’s State Hospital, has been named superintendent of the new Rochester facility.

Bowers had taught French and German at a high school in Canada before attending and earning his medical degree at the University of Michigan.

“There never was a gentleman in Rochester more highly respected or more greatly esteemed by all who know him,” according to Joseph Leonard’s “History of Olmsted County,” published in 1910.

On January 1, 1879, the new Rochester State Hospital for the Insane received its first patients – 100 patients transferred from St. Peter’s Institution. Over the next decade, Bowers and his staff set high standards for the operation of the institution.

The hospital operated a farm in what is now Quarry Hill Park. In 1882 what is now the Quarry Hill Caves was dug to serve as a cellar for the storage of many farm grown vegetables. A team of six men from the public hospital dug the series of caves in the soft sandstone.

Dr. Jacob E. Bowers served as superintendent of Rochester State Hospital from 1879 to 1889.

Contribution / Olmsted County History Center

However, “a most unfortunate event”, as Leonard described it, took place on April 1, 1889.

Two hospital staff attendants reported that Taylor Combs, a 37-year-old patient they were monitoring, fell from scaffolding while cleaning the ceiling. According to attendants August Beckman, 25, and Edward Peterson, 23, Combs asked for a drink of water after his fall and then went to bed. Shortly after, he was found dead.

A seemingly cursory examination by the county coroner determined that Combs had suffered a fractured sternum and died of internal bleeding.

Combs, a black man born into slavery in Missouri, was serving a 30-year prison sentence for rape when he was sent to the state hospital for treatment for “mania.” He was reported as a polite patient but was prone to outbursts of violence. He and Beckman had had an argument of some sort a few days earlier.

The “accident” story was accepted by hospital authorities, and Combs’ body was returned to his family in St. Paul. However, word quickly spread that John Date, a 20-year-old laborer, had painted in a nearby hallway and witnessed what had happened to Combs. Date, however, was afraid of reprisals from Beckman and at first refused to say what he had seen.

Eventually, Date revealed to authorities that he observed Beckman and Peterson beat Combs with a broomstick and cane, then kneel on the victim’s chest.

unnamed (1).jpg

Rochester State Hospital Administration Building, circa 1930.

Contribution / Olmsted County History Center

Superintendent Bowers, when informed of Date’s version of events, fired Beckman and Peterson, but did not bother to report what had happened to the hospital board or to law enforcement. It turns out that, as the History of Olmsted County reports, the legislature at the time was considering a major appropriation for public hospitals, and any adverse publicity could have jeopardized that funding.

But as news of Date’s story spread, Bowers was suspended, Beckman and Peterson were charged with manslaughter, and a state investigation was opened. Combs’s body was exhumed and an examination revealed that the fatal injuries were much more serious than originally thought.

At a trial in June, Beckman and Peterson were found guilty and sent to prison. Beckman was sentenced to four years in prison and Peterson was sentenced to three years.

unnamed (2).jpg

This 1889 Rochester Post newspaper clipping of the Combs’ trial describes the courtroom as “crowded with spectators at the opening of court.”

Contribution / Olmsted County History Center

Meanwhile, officials began a lengthy investigation into conditions at the hospital. Governor-appointed investigators interviewed dozens of witnesses, including hospital staff and patients. A pattern of patient abuse by poorly paid and undertrained attendants has been uncovered. Bowers, however, was absolved of any wrongdoing in the Combs case.
In fact, investigators “highly praised his ability and conscientious loyalty” in running the hospital, according to Leonard’s book. Now that he has been exonerated, Bowers has resigned from his position. He went into private practice, first in St. Paul, then in Duluth.

Before leaving Rochester, Bowers was feted with a reception at the Cook Hotel, where he received a gold watch, and where “highly commendatory addresses” were delivered by, among others, attorney CC Willson (who had represented Beckman and Peterson in their lawsuit), and Dr. William W. Mayo.

The hospital closed in 1982. Rochester Federal Medical Center was built on the grounds of the old hospital in 1984.

]]>
Austin Eugene Chapman – The Tryon Daily Bulletin https://homerailwayjournal.com/austin-eugene-chapman-the-tryon-daily-bulletin/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 21:59:07 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/austin-eugene-chapman-the-tryon-daily-bulletin/ Tryon, North Carolina, lost a favorite son on Wednesday, January 5, with the death of Austin Eugene Chapman. Austin was born January 20, 1940 to Demus and Evelyn Chapman and raised on Howard Gap Road. At Tryon High School, Austin distinguished himself as the Tryon Tigers full-back and was elected to the All-Conference Skyline “A” […]]]>


Tryon, North Carolina, lost a favorite son on Wednesday, January 5, with the death of Austin Eugene Chapman.

Austin was born January 20, 1940 to Demus and Evelyn Chapman and raised on Howard Gap Road. At Tryon High School, Austin distinguished himself as the Tryon Tigers full-back and was elected to the All-Conference Skyline “A” team. During that regular season, Austin has scored 112 points on 18 touchdowns and four conversions, even hitting 5 touchdowns in a single game. Austin also distinguished himself in other ways, serving in his church, the Beta Club, in the school newspaper, as senior class vice president, and graduating from the 1958 Salutatorian class. .

Austin secured a post at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, where he served as a battalion commander during his first class year and earned a Bachelor of Science degree with the class of 1963. After being Appointed ensign in the United States Navy, Austin trained to fly at Pensacola, Florida and earned his golden wings as a jet pilot in February 1965. In his first squadron, the VA-56, Austin Chapman received the Britannia Award. as the 1956 Naval Air Training Command Flight Student of the Year. Austin first flew the A-4 Skyhawk, then the A-7 Corsair, and eventually was able to fly almost every Navy inventory planes, including helicopters. Later in life, Austin (Call Sign “Red Fox”) would say that his 30 year career in the US Navy allowed him to live out all of his childhood dreams, as he served in many air force posts. carrier based, attended Naval Post-Graduate School in Monterrey, Calif., where he received his master’s degree in operations research and held OPNAV and Joint Staff positions.

During his 30 years of military service, Captain Austin Chapman carried out 227 combat sorties in Vietnam, carried out more than 1,000 aircraft carrier landings, made 8 overseas deployments in all geographic areas of operation, commanded 3 aviation units (one squadron and two Carrier Air Wings), and served as director of three main staffs. Austin has traveled the world as a personal assistant to the chief of naval operations, was a negotiator of international treaties and was director of the Naval Institute Press. He has also won 11 personal medals, including the Legion of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Air Medal, the Navy Medal of Honor, and various service and campaign medals.

After retiring in 1993, Austin Chapman returned to his hometown of Tryon, where he lovingly began to rebuild, remodel and renovate a home in Gillette Woods. He became active with the Holy Cross Episcopal Church, which he attended in high school, and served in the sacristy. He was also vice-president of the Polk County Community Foundation and president of the Gillette Woods Homeowner’s Association. As a member of the board of directors of St. Luke’s Hospital, Austin was named a member of the Second Wind Hall of Fame. Austin was elected to Tryon City Council in 2007, even for two years as mayor pro tempore. He has also volunteered with the Children’s Theater Festival and the Blue Ridge Bar-B-Que Festival and served as a Cub leader.

Austin loved Polk County, the mountains and Tryon, North Carolina. No matter where the Navy sent him he carried Tryon in his heart and he truly believed that the only good reason a person should leave such a beautiful place was because his country had asked him to. He loved spending time in his basement “making sawdust,” his modest term for creating beautiful furniture, one piece of which was featured in Fine Woodworking magazine. Most of all, Austin loved his family.

Austin was predeceased by his parents, Demus and Evelyn, his two sisters, Ann Chapman (Murphey) and Jane Chapman (Strong), and his first wife for 26 years, Anne Lynne Holcombe Chapman of Spartanburg, SC. He is survived by his wife of 23 years, Caroline Moore Chapman of Tryon, his daughters Lynne Chapman Mandell (Robert) of Pace, FL and Susannah Robinson (Kris) of Jacksonville, FL, and his son Thomson Flynn Moore Chapman (Jordan) from Washington. , DC Additionally, Austin leaves behind 9 grandchildren (Gentry (Rob), Finley, Effie, Tucker, Harris, Toby, Tanner, Sarah and Luke), cousins, nephews, nieces, great-nephews and great-nieces, as well as countless friends, squad mates and colleagues who have been positively touched by this good and honest man.

The funeral will be on Saturday at 2:00 p.m. at the Church of the Holy Cross, 150 Melrose Avenue in Tryon with a reception to follow.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks you to consider donations to the Wounded Warriors Project (woundedwarriorproject.org – Honor & Memorial Donation) or the Tunnels to Towers Foundation (t2t.org).

An online guest register is available at mcfarlandfuneralchapel.com

McFarland Funeral Chapel and Crematorium

Tryon, North Carolina


]]>
December 24-26, 2021 | Bulletin board https://homerailwayjournal.com/december-24-26-2021-bulletin-board/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/december-24-26-2021-bulletin-board/ Merry Christmastide (The period from sunset on Christmas Eve to the evening of January 5, Epiphany Eve.) It is also known as the Twelve Days of Christmas or Yuletide. * * * For a good cause : Sarah Hoffman, communications director for the Greater Latrobe Fellowship of Christian Athletes, has announced that the FCA will […]]]>


Merry Christmastide (The period from sunset on Christmas Eve to the evening of January 5, Epiphany Eve.) It is also known as the Twelve Days of Christmas or Yuletide.

* * *

For a good cause :

Sarah Hoffman, communications director for the Greater Latrobe Fellowship of Christian Athletes, has announced that the FCA will be collecting canned goods next month for the Westmoreland County Food Bank.

The “Take Down Hunger” event will be held at Greater Latrobe Senior High School on Tuesday January 11, during the Greater Latrobe wrestling match against Norwin.

Sarah explained, “Some of our officers and other members will have collection tables set up for collection before and during the first half of the game.”

* * *

Dave O’Barto has announced that Sons of the American Legion Post 982 (Pipetown), a non-profit organization, will be hosting the Michael Osenkowski Memorial Veterans Breakfast Buffet from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday, January 16, at the home of job.

All veterans eat free; everyone else pays $ 6. The buffet will feature scrambled eggs, hash browns, sausages, pancakes, toast, coffee and juice.

Everyone is welcome. The post house is located on American Legion Road, off Charles Houck Road, in Unity Township.

* * *

This note arrived on Monday:

“Louise, thank you very much for putting the Nativity announcement live in the newspaper. We really appreciated that. We’re so excited about it and pray and hope people will come out of it. It is very special. Merry Christmas. Debbie.

Debbie is the Business Administrator for Latrobe United Methodist Church, 440 Main Street. LUMC Ministries presented the Nativity live with Christmas carols and refreshments from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, December 21, Wednesday, December 22, and Thursday, December 23. Everything was free.

Newsletter The six photos of editor-in-chief Chris Ulicne from the opening night were published on the front page on Wednesday.

Debbie’s comments after seeing Wednesday’s edition:

“Ah, Louise. We just received our journal, and the photos of the living nativity scene are beautiful. Please say “thank you very much” to Chris and thank you again. Merry Christmas, Debbie.

* * *

Thelma Kemerer from Unity Township recently called the Newsletter newsroom to say that she has a special memory of a vacation approaching 80 years old.

Kemerer – who is still strong at 95 – said she still had a copy of an elder Newsletter photo taken when she and her sister, Janet, attended a nursery in the late 1930s.

Although the sisters are not listed in the photo caption, Kemerer estimated she was between 8 and 10 years old at the time.

She said the Nativity was placed in a barn outside Latrobe and that it included sheep from her family’s farm. One of the reasons Kemerer, whose maiden name is Stewart, and his sister were at the Nativity was to help calm the sheep.

My thanks to Newsletter Assistant editor Nick Cammuso for contributing to this news article.

* * *

Wondering where to dine on New Years Day?

St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church offers a free pork and sauerkraut dinner to all community members from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Monday, January 1 at the church, 108 Dutch Hill Road, Latrobe (Trauger, Township of Mount Pleasant).

Traditional pork and sauerkraut, mashed potatoes, green beans, fresh rolls, hot dogs, homemade desserts and drinks will be served.

The organizers invite all members of the community to “please join your neighbors for a wonderful time of fellowship as we begin the new year”.

Call 724-423-2590 with any questions or visit www.splchurch.com.

* * *

West Newton Public Library Director Robin Matty announced that the library at 124 N. Water St. had received “a large donation of current magazines from a customer who buys them weekly when she is shopping and a gift of Zoo magazines for young people. Stop and take as much as you want for free. They are located in our refill bag for $ 5 in the back room.

The opening hours of the library are Mondays and Thursdays from noon to 5 pm; Wednesday from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

My thanks to Joe and Anna Margaret Mosso for the “Christmas Blessings” electronic card that I received on Tuesday morning. I think I’ll play it again.

* * *

Thank you also to Funeral Director John McCabe of McCabe Funeral Home for the colorful tray of assorted Christmas cookies and the “Moments of Peace … Lasting Memories” card which arrived on Wednesday morning. Very appreciated.

* * *

The Westmoreland Museum of American Art, North Main Street, Greensburg, announced its holiday hours on Wednesday:

“Winter has arrived, and it’s pretty freezing outside! During this cold season, warm up at Westmoreland with stimulating exhibits, seasonal drinks, in-person events and more! The Westmoreland will be open throughout the holidays (excluding Christmas Day and New Years Day) for your friends and family to explore! “

WMAA Vacation Hours:

Friday December 24: Early closing, 3 p.m.

Saturday December 25: Closed

Friday December 31: Early closing, 3 p.m.

Saturday January 1st: Closed.

Other than the days listed above, Westmoreland will be open during regular hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

To know before leaving: For updated health and safety policies, including the requirement for proof of vaccination for certain events, click https://www.thewestmoreland.org/covid-19?eType=EmailBlastContent&eId=772ac78e-8633 -417d-89b3-b71bbe568a9f

The museum also invites the public to “stroll in the winter lights. Grab your coats and scarves and check out our display of glowing winter lights for the whole family. To be seen from dusk until 10 p.m. every night until January 30.

* * *

The Westmoreland County Regional Agency on Aging invites all caregivers to attend its monthly Caregiver Support Group meetings.

This support group provides an opportunity for caregivers to discuss concerns, share experiences, and gain support and information from other caregivers. At some meetings, guest speakers discuss topics of interest to caregivers.

Support group meetings are held at the McKenna Center for Active Adults, 971 Old Salem Road, Greensburg, on the second Wednesday of each month from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. All caregivers are welcome to attend. RSVPs are preferred; call Denise Parker at 724-830-4484 or toll free at 1-800-442-8000.

The schedule for 2022 is as follows: January 12, February 9, March 9, April 13, May 11, June 8, July 13, August 10, Sept 14, Oct 12, Nov 9 and Dec 14 .

* * *

Remember that the Hebron Evangelical Lutheran Church, 125 N. Liberty St., Blairsville, welcomes everyone to its candlelight worship service on Friday, December 24.

The musical prelude “Oh Holy Night” will begin at 9:30 p.m. with a worship service, led by Reverend John Smaligo, starting at 10 p.m.

The pastor said, “We hope you will reunite with us as we worship and welcome the Baby Jesus, the newborn King!

* * *

This is from Derry Area College Council Secretary Keegan Watson:

“One of our student’s GPA (cumulative grade point average) was miscalculated in our database system. He should have made the honor roll for the sixth year. His name is Nathan Bates.

In case you missed them, the First Quarter Honor Rolls were released December 10-12. Newsletters weekend Edit: Greater Latrobe High School and GL High School are on page A8, while Derry Area High School, DA High School, and Ligonier Valley High School are on page A9.

* * *

According to the Greater Latrobe School District calendar on www.glsd.us, the Christmas holidays began with an early layoff on Thursday, December 23 and will run through Friday, December 31. Classes will resume on Monday January 3.

* * *

Let’s all have a safe and meaningful Christmas week. Take the time to savor the simple pleasures and the true meaning of the season.

Time and attention are some of the best gifts we can give to our loved ones.

* * *

Email bulletin board items to

Lifestyles Editor Louise F. Fritz

lb.society@verizon.net

no later than 8 a.m. on Thursday


]]>
Leonard Pitts Jr .: It’s time to do something about the books https://homerailwayjournal.com/leonard-pitts-jr-its-time-to-do-something-about-the-books/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 21:02:50 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/leonard-pitts-jr-its-time-to-do-something-about-the-books/ It’s time to do something about the books. And if you expected this sentence to end differently, you didn’t care. In Red America today, books are Public Enemy No.1. As Time magazine recently reported, librarians are seeing a marked increase in censorship activity. Deborah Caldwell-Stone, executive director of the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual […]]]>


It’s time to do something about the books.

And if you expected this sentence to end differently, you didn’t care. In Red America today, books are Public Enemy No.1.

As Time magazine recently reported, librarians are seeing a marked increase in censorship activity. Deborah Caldwell-Stone, executive director of the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom, called it “an unprecedented volume of challenges.” From Texas to South Carolina, Virginia to Florida and beyond, conservative governors and advocacy groups are removing books from school libraries, especially those that deal with the two subjects they find most threatening: sexuality and race.

Everything to protect our children.

You can tell it doesn’t make sense. You can look at what happened last week at a high school in Oxford, Michigan – four students killed, six more and a teacher injured – and say that what we need to protect our children from is the fact that Any struggling classmate can also easily obtain a weapon of mass destruction to work with through their teenage angst. But on this subject, these same governors and pressure groups will give you nothing but great silence.

In their world, a mass shooting is just a natural, unpleasant, but inevitable phenomenon, like rain. Would you like to try to ban clouds?

No, from where they sit, the most serious threat our children face is not from bullets but from books, and they will not rest until the scourge of knowledge is defeated. Which makes sense what a funhouse mirror is to its actual appearance: a hopelessly distorted reality.

We live in a world where students huddle under their desks in active shooting practice, but conservatives fear learning about the breed could make them uncomfortable. A world where kids suffer from PTSD after seeing friends slaughtered, but conservatives fear reading about sex will expose them to things they are not yet ready for. A world where kids go to school with bulletproof backpacks, but the Conservatives think the books have gotten out of hand.

Consider the photo the Kentucky rep tweeted last week of him and his family posing in front of a Christmas tree with sparkling plastic smiles, all cradling long guns. Massie’s tweet read: “Merry Christmas! Ps. Santa, please bring ammo.” To be conservative is to believe that this is not at all scary and fetishistic, nor indicative of insecurity and overcompensation, nor even slightly suggestive of an unhealthy phallic fixation. To be conservative is to think it’s entirely appropriate to post, just days after the deadliest school shooting since 2018, to celebrate the birth of a man called the Prince of Peace.

To be conservative is to see that image and be convinced that America’s problem is too many books.

Never mind that no book has ever pierced flesh and broken bones, no book has ever shed blood, no book has ever left an empty place at a table. And never mind that in America too many kids find it easier to get their hands on a Glock than a copy of “Beloved.” Tragically, some of us are fine with this.

After all, you have to set your priorities. You need to protect what matters most to you.

Leonard Pitts Jr. is a columnist for the Miami Herald. Readers can contact him by email at lpitts@miamiherald.com.

(C) 2021 Miami Herald.
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


]]>
Dave Campbell, Founder of Texas Football Magazine, Dies at 96 | National sports https://homerailwayjournal.com/dave-campbell-founder-of-texas-football-magazine-dies-at-96-national-sports/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 04:11:24 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/dave-campbell-founder-of-texas-football-magazine-dies-at-96-national-sports/ WACO, TX (AP) – Dave Campbell, founder of the Texas Football preview magazine that has become a staple in this football-mad state, has passed away. He was 96 years old. Campbell died Friday night at his home in Waco, said Greg Tepper, editor of Dave Campbell’s Texas Football. Known as “the bible of Texan football,” […]]]>


WACO, TX (AP) – Dave Campbell, founder of the Texas Football preview magazine that has become a staple in this football-mad state, has passed away. He was 96 years old.

Campbell died Friday night at his home in Waco, said Greg Tepper, editor of Dave Campbell’s Texas Football.

Known as “the bible of Texan football,” the magazine was started by Campbell in 1960, seven years after he became sports editor for the Waco Tribune-Herald.

Campbell held both roles for 25 years before selling the magazine and became synonymous with Baylor coverage in her role with the Waco newspaper. Baylor’s McLane Stadium press box bears his name and he maintained a presence at sporting events until his death. Campbell retired from the newspaper in 1993.

While the magazine started out as a comprehensive guide to former Southwestern Conference and high school teams, it has grown to become the primary source of preparation coverage in the state.

Texas Football hosts the weekly high school football rankings that are distributed by The Associated Press, and Tepper has a strong presence in television coverage during the regular season and playoffs. He is one of the studio hosts during Championship Week for all six state classifications.

After selling the magazine in 1985, Campbell retained the title of editor until the 2021 preview edition. The magazine’s release became a summer rite for high school football fans in Canada. Texas.

“I grew up with the magazine and it’s the law when it comes to Texas high school football,” said Austin Westlake coach Todd Dodge, who was a Texas starting quarterback after a brilliant career in high school in Port Arthur and won six state championships. as a coach. “I was in the magazine in the summer of 1980, and we were looking forward to receiving this magazine and even today it is still a big deal for the kids.”

Campbell is part of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame, which he helped save after the original location in the Dallas area closed in 1986. The facility moved to Waco and reopened in 1993. Campbell was also a former president of the Football Writers Association of America.

Born in Waco in 1925, Campbell has never lived anywhere else except for the three years he served in the military during World War II when he was awarded a Bronze Star.

After the war Campbell graduated from Baylor and returned to work at the Tribune-Herald, where he had started as a copier three days after graduating from high school.

Campbell’s wife of 70 years, Reba Campbell, passed away in January 2020.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


]]>
Calendar of events 02-08 Dec. | GO! Magazine https://homerailwayjournal.com/calendar-of-events-02-08-dec-go-magazine/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 23:30:00 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/calendar-of-events-02-08-dec-go-magazine/ Daily NWX Tour of Lights: Check out the Christmas decorations at NWX. Printed maps available at Tree Lighting on Thursdays, or stop by Roundabout Books throughout the tour to pick up a copy; free; NorthWest Crossing neighborhood, Bend; visitnwx.com Thursday 02/2 Tai Chi Class: This holistic approach focuses on the whole body as well as […]]]>


Daily

NWX Tour of Lights: Check out the Christmas decorations at NWX. Printed maps available at Tree Lighting on Thursdays, or stop by Roundabout Books throughout the tour to pick up a copy; free; NorthWest Crossing neighborhood, Bend; visitnwx.com

Thursday 02/2

Tai Chi Class: This holistic approach focuses on the whole body as well as mental and spiritual aspects. Taught by the great master Franklin; 9:30 am-10:30am; $ 15 to $ 70 the first class is free; TDS Dance Studio, 1601 Newport Ave, Bend; grandmasterfranklin.com or 541-797-9620.

Family Empowerment Luncheon: Latino Community Association Luncheon raises funds to support English, Computer and Citizenship classes, Employment Assistance, Legal Clinics, Tax Assistance, enrollment in health insurance, youth development and more; 11:45 a.m.-1: 00 p.m. $ 10 online ticket, additional donations appreciated; Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 61980 Skyline Ranch Road, Bend; classy.org or 541-815-2401.

18th Annual COCC Holiday Art Sale: Browse a wide selection of handcrafted and whimsical art items created by COCC students and faculty; 12 pm-5pm; COCC Coats Campus Center-Wille Hall, 2600 NW College Way, Bend; cocc.edu or 541-383-7700.

Winter Nights Series: Join us after hours to see the latest exhibits. The Rimrock Café will be open to people for a beer or a bite to eat, as will the museum store; 4 pm-8pm; $ 10 adults, $ 6 children aged 3 to 12, free members; High Desert Museum, 59800 SUS Highway 97, Bend; highdesertmuseum.org or 541-382-4754.

Know Celebrate – Klezmer Fiddle and Yiddish Songs: Enjoy this intimate violin rendition of Yiddish folk songs; 4 pm-5pm; free; Deschutes Public Library, online; deschuteslibrary.org or 541-312-1029.

Author event: “Atlas of the Heart”, by Brené Brown: author Brown will discuss his new novel on Zoom; 5 pm-6pm; Roundabout Books, online; rond-pointbookshop.com or 541-306-6564.

Wintervention: Hoodoo is offering over $ 50,000 in prizes, including lift tickets, lodging, skis, snowboards, gear, goods and more; 6 pm-8pm; Avid Cider, 550 Industrial Way, Bend; facebook.com/HoodooRecreation or 541-633-7757.

Author Event: “These Precious Days”, by Ann Patchett: The author will discuss her new novel via Zoom; 6 pm-7pm; Roundabout Books, online; rond-pointbookshop.com or 541-306-6564.

Trivia Night: We’re bringing a nostalgic twist to trivia games with large, hand-crafted replicas of Trivial Pursuit wheels; 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. free; Craft Kitchen & Brewery, 125 NW Oregon Ave, Bend or 541-749-8611.

Friday 12/3

Support League of Bend Holiday Decor Sale: A holiday decoration sale that features lovingly decorated trees, ribbons, ornaments, Santas, reindeer and more. The profits go to children and adults in need; 9 am-4pm; free; Bend Assistance League, 210 SE Urania Lane, Bend; http: // http: assistanceleage.org/bend or 541-389-2075.

18th Annual COCC Holiday Art Sale: Browse a wide selection of handcrafted and whimsical art items created by COCC students and faculty; 10 am-5pm; COCC Coats Campus Center-Wille Hall, 2600 NW College Way, Bend; cocc.edu or 541-383-7700.

SantaLand in the Old Mill District: Head to Center Plaza and take a free photo with the cheerful man in the big red suit; 11 am-3pm; free; Old Mill District, 450 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 422, Bend; oldmilldistrict.com or 541-312-0131.

Thrive Central Oregon Walk-In Consultations: Free 30-Minute Walk-In Consultations With Social Services To Connect To Housing, Medical Resources, Mental Health, Veterans, Social Security Assistance And More Again ; 1 pm-4pm; Bend Town Center Public Library, 601 NW Wall St., Bend; deschuteslibrary.org or 541-617-7050.

First Friday Art Walk in the Old Mill District: Tumalo Art Co., Lubbesmeyer Art Studio & Gallery, Amejko Artistry, Saxon’s Fine Jewelers, Winsome Construction and City Home will host events featuring a range of artists and mediums; 3 pm-6pm; Old Mill District, 450 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 422, Bend; oldmilldistrict.com or 541-312-0131.

Carolers in the Old Mill Neighborhood: Carolers of all ages will serenade the Old Mill neighborhood with their vacation favorites; 3 pm-4:30pm; Old Mill District, 450 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 422, Bend; oldmilldistrict.com or 541-312-0131.

Bend Community Tree Lighting & Holiday Art Walk: Join the community for tree lighting atop Drake Park; 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. free; Downtown Bend, 916 NW Wall St, Bend; centrevillebend.org or 541-788-3628.

25th Anniversary Party: Kick off the winter season by celebrating with limited-edition Oregon Adaptive Sports products and the BBC’s latest winter beer; 5 pm-10pm; Bend Brewing Company, 1019 NW Brooks St., Bend; facebook.com/Bend-Brewing-Co or 541-383-1599.

Knowledge is Power Tree Workshop: This course is essential for learning how to manage your trees in the central Oregon climate, prevent disease for the longevity of their life, and take action on all of these topics at the right time. year ; 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. free; The Shop Forestry & Supply, 63120 Nels Anderson Road, Bend; eventbrite.com or 360-461-6473.

“National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation”: this film is the first in a series of holiday films to be shown at the Tower Theater; 7 p.m. $ 10 to $ 15 plus fees; Tower Theater, 835 NW Wall St., Bend; towertheatre.org or 541-317-0700.

Miracle on 34th Street – The Play: a holiday classic adapted by Mountain Community Theater from the novel by Valentine Davies; 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $ 27 adult, senior / student $ 25; Cascades Theatrical Company, 148 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend; cascadestheatrical.org or 541-389-0803.

Live Tales – “Metamorphosis”: Storytellers Peter Gunby, Katy Ipock, Pauly Anderson and Diane Allen performing live; 7:30 p.m. $ 25 plus fees; Craft Kitchen & Brewery, 62988 Layton Ave., Suite 103, Bend; craftoregon.com or 541-668-1766.

Fantastic Fridaze Dance Party: Dance to the sound of DJ N8ture with visuals and a great dance floor; 9 p.m. free; Midtown Ballroom, 51 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend; midtownballroom.com or 541-408-4329.

Saturday 12/4

Support League of Bend Holiday Decor Sale: A holiday decoration sale that features lovingly decorated trees, ribbons, ornaments, Santas, reindeer and more. The profits go to children and adults in need; 9 am-1pm; free; Bend Assistance League, 210 SE Urania Lane, Bend; http: // http: assistanceleage.org/bend or 541-389-2075.

Know Celebrate – Sisters High School Jazz Choir Caroling: Enjoy the holiday harmonies at an outdoor singing event; 11 am-12pm; free; Sisters’ Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; deschuteslibrary.org or 541-312-1070.

SantaLand in the Old Mill District: get off at Center Plaza and take a free photo with the cheerful man in the big red suit; 11 am-3pm; free; Old Mill District, 450 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 422, Bend; oldmilldistrict.com or 541-312-0131.

Bend Christmas Parade: Christmas floats will cross downtown for the 30th year; noon; Downtown Bend, Bend; bendchristmasparade.org.

“Elf”: This film is the second in a series of holiday films to be screened at the Tower Theater; 7 p.m. $ 10 to $ 15 plus fees; Tower Theater, 835 NW Wall St., Bend; towertheatre.org or 541-317-0700.

‘Miracle on 34th Street’ – The Play: A holiday classic adapted by Mountain Community Theater from the novel by Valentine Davies; 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $ 27 adult, senior / student $ 25; Cascades Theatrical Company, 148 NW Greenwood Ave, Bend; cascadestheatrical.org or 541-389-0803.

Cory Michaelis & Andrew Rivers: comedians Andrew Rivers and Cory Michaelis team up for an evening of laughs; 8 pm-11pm; $ 15 to $ 30; Midtown Ballroom, 51 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend; eventbrite.com or 541-408-4329.

Comedy in the trade: comedians Cody Michael, Erin Oren and Stuart Wilson will perform; 8 p.m. $ 15 online, $ 20 at the door; Craft Kitchen & Brewery, 62988 Layton Ave., Suite 103, Bend; ipockolypticproductions.wordpress.com or 541-668-1766.

Sunday 5/12

Not Cho ‘Grandma’s Bingo: The weekly bingo game will take place on the brewery terrace; 10:00 am; the price of the cards varies depending on the game; Silver Moon Brewing, 24 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend; silvermoonbrewing.com or 541-388-8331.

Miracle on 34th Street – The Play: a holiday classic adapted by Mountain Community Theater from the novel by Valentine Davies; 2 pm-4pm; $ 27 adult, senior / student $ 25; Cascades Theatrical Company, 148 NW Greenwood Ave, Bend; cascadestheatrical.org or 541-389-0803.

A Novel Idea Unveiled 2022: Be among the first to know the book selected for A Novel Idea 2022; 4 pm-5pm; free; Deschutes Public Library, online; deschutespubliclibrary.org

Hanukkah celebration: go see the giant menorah lighting and enjoy food and friends; 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. free; Shalom Bayit, Modoc Lane, Bend; jccobend.org or 541-668-6887.

Monday 6/6

Quiz Mondays: Bring your team of up to four people and find a place to play for a chance to win prizes in weekly quiz quizzes; 6:00 p.m. Legend Cider Co, 52670 Hwy 97, La Pine; facebook.com/legendcider or 541-610-3357.

Natural History Pub – The Changing Glaciers of Oregon and the American West: Join Portland State Glaciologist Andrew Fountain to learn about glacier changes in Oregon and the West the United States and its connection to glaciers elsewhere; 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. free; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend; highdesertmuseum.org or 541-382-4754.

Tuesday 12/7

Tai Chi Class: This holistic approach focuses on the whole body as well as mental and spiritual aspects. Taught by the great master Franklin; 9:30 am-10:30am; $ 15 to $ 70 the first class is free; TDS Dance Studio, 1601 Newport Ave, Bend; grandmasterfranklin.com or 541-797-9620.

Writers Writing – How to Self-Edit: This workshop will focus on the skills you need to edit your own work. Amanda Skenandore is the award-winning author of three historical novels; 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. free registration required; Deschutes Public Library, online; deschuteslibrary.org or 541-617-7050.

Adult Co-Ed Dodgeball: Learn to play or hone your skills with Social League Dodgeball. Open to all skill levels, abilities, genders and levels of competitiveness; 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $ 7; Central Oregon Community College – Mazama Gym, 2600 NW College Way, Bend; benddodgeball.com or 541-383-7700.

Out of Thin Air improvisation theater: The local improvisation troupe will create scenes and sketches based on the audience’s suggestions; 8 p.m. $ 10 to $ 15 plus fees; Open Space Event Studios, 220 NE Lafayette Ave, Bend; openspace.studio.

Wednesday 08/12 /

Wine Wednesdays at the Flights Wine Bar: Happy hour all day every Wednesday wine; Flights Wine Bar, 59868 Calgary Loop, Bend; volswinebend.com or 541-728-0753.

Living Well with Chronic Diseases: Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson County Health Departments are offering this six-week online course to support people living with chronic illnesses; 2 pm-4pm; free suggested donation of $ 10 for the workbook; Your health in central Oregon; votresantecentraloregon.org.

Comedy Open Mic: Go downstairs and watch comics come up with new tunes or get up and try to defend yourself; 8 pm-10pm; free; Craft Kitchen & Brewery, 62988 Layton Ave., Suite 103, Bend; ipockolypticproductions.wordpress.com.


]]>
Minnesota bestselling poet Robert Bly dies at 94 | https://homerailwayjournal.com/minnesota-bestselling-poet-robert-bly-dies-at-94/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 19:05:00 +0000 https://homerailwayjournal.com/minnesota-bestselling-poet-robert-bly-dies-at-94/ MINNEAPOLIS – Robert Bly, the National Book Award winning poet who began writing bucolic poems about rural Minnesota and then rocked the complacent world of 1950s poetry, stood up against the war, featured poets international to Western readers and has become a bestselling author. teaching men how to be in touch with their feelings, died […]]]>


MINNEAPOLIS – Robert Bly, the National Book Award winning poet who began writing bucolic poems about rural Minnesota and then rocked the complacent world of 1950s poetry, stood up against the war, featured poets international to Western readers and has become a bestselling author. teaching men how to be in touch with their feelings, died Sunday, just a month before his 95th birthday.

In his heyday, Bly was known for performing poetry readings – reading poems two or three times, just because he liked their sound; read the work of other writers; wear a rubber scare mask or embroidered vest on stage; reading to the background music of drums and sitars.

But despite his theatricality, he has always been extremely serious about poetry and its importance in the cultural and political landscape. He was passionate about words.

Bly lived most of her life in her native Minnesota, a familiar figure in local literary events until recent years, when her memory began to fade. His last public reading was on April 13, 2015, at the Plymouth Congregational Church in Minneapolis, where he launched the “Like New Moon, I’ll Live My Life” collection. One by one, 24 poets read their favorite Bly poems before Bly himself got up and read “Moon Behind a Cottonwood Tree”, “Arriving in the North Woods” and the poem that became his ending hymn. life, “Keeping Our Little Boat Afloat”, on survival, grace and death. He banged his cane on the church floor to the rhythm of the words.

After that, he occasionally attended readings, sometimes leaving before they were finished, but he no longer read in public. His latest book, “Robert Bly: Collected Poems”, was published in December 2018 by WW Norton.

In his essay “The Village Troublemaker,” the late poet Tony Hoagland described Bly this way: “Well over six feet, chunky in girth, with a sloppy rooster comb of thick black hair, he stood on stage at the front of the auditorium, in a Peruvian serape. ”Bly, Hoagland wrote,“ has always been combative.… He has attacked any establishment that caught his attention, ”from the US government to war, to consumerism, to old-fashioned views of patriarchy.

Bly was born on the family farm in Madison, Minnesota on December 23, 1926, one of two sons to Jacob and Alice Bly. After high school, he spent two years in the US Navy, working with radar and sonar. He attended St. Olaf College for a year before transferring to Harvard, where he studied with Archibald MacLeish and was part of a group of spirited young writers – John Ashbery, Donald Hall, Harold Brodky, George Plimpton and Adrienne Rich. They were all irascible, Bly said in a 2000 interview with the Paris Review – himself included. “I swelled my throat like an iguana.”

After college, he spent four years writing in New York with little success, even trying his hand at the theater. “I wanted to be a playwright and I wrote a play called ‘Martin Luther’. The problem was that no one in my family was speaking,” he told the Paris Review, and his efforts to write dialogue therefore went on. failed. “This effort was hopeless from the start.”

Bly attended the Iowa Writers Workshop, married Duluth short story writer Carol McLean, then received a Fulbright and went to Norway to study and translate Norwegian poetry. It was there that he became fascinated with the idea of ​​publishing South American, Scandinavian, and European poets, and he began working on translations by Pablo Neruda, Cesar Vallejo, Gunnar Ekelof, and others.

Back in Minnesota, the Bly’s moved to a rustic farmhouse outside of Madison, half a mile from where he grew up. His father had sold the family farm and bought three smaller farms. “One that he kept to himself, one that he gave to my brother, Jim, because he knew he was going to be a farmer, and one that he gave to me because he knew that I was not going to be, ”Bly told the Star Tribune. in 2009.

The Bly’s lived rustic – the house had no running water until 1962 – and their four children, Mary, Bridget, Noah and Micah, were born there. In her memoir, “Paris in Love”, Mary Bly remembers a summer when her father was in charge of the breakfasts. “He specialized in big boiled tongues,” she wrote. “A piece of tongue always seemed to be on the kitchen counter, labeled ‘lunch.’ I stared at him, pushed away, until I was so hungry that I sprinkled a lump of salt on it and choked it. “

With teacher William Duffy, Robert and Carol Bly founded a literary magazine called The Fifties, in which they published avant-garde poems and poets in translation. The first issue of The Fifties, published in the summer of 1958, stated: “The editors of this magazine believe that most of the poetry published in America today is too old-fashioned. People paid attention. “When I read Robert Bly’s magazine, I wrote him a letter,” James Wright told the Paris Review in 1975. Wright, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1972 and died in 1980, taught at the ‘time at the University of Minnesota. His letter to Bly “was 16 pages long and single-spaced, and all Bly said in response was, ‘Come to the farm,'” Wright said.

The farm has become a gathering place for writers including Wright, Bill Holm, Donald Hall, Lewis Hyde, Tomas Transtromer, Frederick Manfred and many more. After Duffy left the magazine, Wright and others helped edit.

Bly’s first collection, “Silence in the Snowy Fields,” was published in 1962. “I spent entire days sitting in the fields,” he told the Paris Review. “But there was peace. I had always had a great love for silence. … I would never have written such an interesting book if I had not returned to the country where I was a child.”

In 1966, Bly co-founded the American Writers Against the Vietnam War. In 1968 he won the National Book Award for his second collection, “The Light Around the Body,” which included poems harshly criticizing the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War. He donated the prize money to the anti-war movement.

Her poem, “The Teeth Mother Naked at Last” is considered one of the most important poems of the Vietnam War. He begins: “Massive engines lift up beautifully from the bridge. / Wings appear above the trees, wings with eight hundred rivets … Helicopters fly above. Death- / the bee is coming.”

Bly continued to write, translate, edit and publish for the next 40 years; in the 1970s he published 11 books of poetry, essays and translations. In 1975 he founded the Great Mother and New Father Conference, a gathering of poets, storytellers and mythologists, which continues to meet annually.

He and Carol Bly divorced in 1979 (Carol Bly died in 2007) and in 1980 he married Ruth Counsell, a Jungian psychologist and analyst. They moved into their home in the Kenwood neighborhood of Minneapolis in 1993.

His 1990 book “Iron John” catapulted him to mainstream fame. The book was inspired by Bly’s intense grief at the death of her father, and it became an international bestseller, captivating thousands of men, drawing them to conferences to talk about their fathers and their emotions. In 1991, he was named one of People magazine’s “most intriguing people”.

In a 1990 documentary “A Gathering of Men”, Bill Moyers and Bly explored the changing role of men in modern America. In 2009, the Andersen Library at the University of Minnesota sponsored a four-day symposium on Bly that included readings, workshops, and a bus ride back to Madison, where Bly reunited with old friends and toured his old studio in handwriting, which had been moved from the farm. at the Lac Qui Parle County Museum, furniture and books intact.

In a ceremony at the museum, Bly’s niece, Julie Ludvigson, recalled seeing Bly on the farm when he was young, steering the tractor with one hand and holding an open book with the other. “And then when he got over the hill, it sometimes took a long time for him to come back,” she said.

Bly has published over 25 collections of her own poetry and over a dozen collections of poetry in translation. His translation of Ibsen’s “Peer Gynt” was performed by the Guthrie Theater in 2008, with Mark Rylance.

In addition to the National Book Award, he received the 2013 Robert Frost Medal, the Transtromer Poetry Prize in Sweden, and the Guggenheim, Rockefeller and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships. He was Minnesota’s first poet laureate from 2008-2011 and won a McKnight Distinguished Artist Award in 2000. In 2015, at the annual conference, the Association of Writers and Writing Programs celebrated his work with Hoagland Discussions and others, crowned with a reading by Bly himself.

In 2012, his daughter Mary, a teacher and author, spoke to Minnesota Public Radio about Bly’s failing memory.

“My mother-in-law was talking about watching a video of him… and he said ‘I love this guy!’ And then he said ‘I’d like to know him.’ So it was very difficult for my mother-in-law at that time. But he both recognizes what’s going on – his sense of humor hasn’t gone away at all – and recognizes that life has different phases. . “

———

© 2021 StarTribune. Go to startribune.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


]]>